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After Surgery - Day 2

I had my pituitary surgery Thursday.  We went in at 11 and I was in the PACU by 3.  Total surgery time - 2.5/3 hours.  I was in a different PACU this time, and what a difference!  After the last surgery, I was wheeled into a huge room lined with patients who had just come out of surgery.  No curtains, bright lights, very noisy, and there didn't seem to be enough nurses to go around.  Not the kind of thing that's helpful after someone goes digging around in your head.  I was there for way too long and it was the worst part of the last surgery.

This time, I woke up in a private room, with the lights dimmed, and one nurse who seemed to only have me to worry about.  My bed on the neuro floor wasn't ready, so they brought my parents back to see me here and said I would be there for a while.  It was fine with me!  THe two nurses that took care of me were great, and let me get up to go to the bathroom (which was a nice change from the other PACU).  I quickly realized that I had diabetes insipidus again, I had to pee every 20 minutes and was SO thirsty!  After a few hours of sleeping and peeing, my room was ready.

I ended up in the same room as last time, with the first nurse I had last time too!  As I was wheeled through the halls, a few nurses came to say hi that knew me from last time, they all looked surprised to see me again so soon.  I spend the night peeing and drinking, and did not get any sleep.  Yesterday morning, my mom came in early to sit with me, and my surgeon and his team came to check on me. He said he cleaned out most of the right side, and did 8 biopsies of the left, but left a good portion of the left half of the gland.  He didn't see anything when he was in there, and was already talking about how if this didn't work, then radiation would be the next step. That was a little bit discouraging.  He is not a very optimistic guy though, so I took that into consideration too.

Next, my neuroendocrinologist came in.  She had about 6 other doctors with her that all wanted to see me and talk to me, so they all came in and I had to show them my buffalo hump and stretch marks.  I even had pictures on me from before Cushing's, so they were happy to see those too!  They all had a ton of questions, and it was kind of fun getting to answer all of them and have them learn about Cushing's from me.  Everyone else left, and my doctor stayed for a few minutes to see how I was feeling.  I felt pretty good, but mentioned that after the last surgery, all of my swelling disappeared very quickly, and my legs were still swollen and my face was still bright red.  She said it's too soon to know for sure whether this surgery worked, but if it didn't we had more options then just radiation.  I really wanted to go home, and even though they usually keep people for 2 nights, she agreed to let me go home with the agreement that I would call them if anything came up instead of trying to handle it myself.  Last time no one called me with my sodium levels, so I went to the hospital and realized they were low and treated myself by not drinking.  I did all the right things, but my doctor was not happy that no one called me to tell me.  If I hadn't know to do that, I might've had much bigger problems on my hands.

So I'm home now, on DDAVP which is a hormone that helps my body hold onto water so I won't have to get up every 20-30 minutes to pee, and feeling ok.  We'll see how the next few days go!

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