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I lasted 10 whole days at work

Then I woke up on Monday morning with a fever of 104.2 and a sore throat.  Since 90% of the kids we've seen in the office this week had strep, I figured that's what it was and called my mom to come to the doctor's with me.  On the way up I had a bad feeling, and felt like I felt TOO sick if I just had strep.  Turns out my bad feeling was totally right.

We got there and my heart rate was around 140, combine that with a positive rapid strep test and my recent pituitary surgery and they sent me in an ambulance to MGH.  Of course, this is the one week that my endocrinologist is on vacation, so I talked to someone else who seemed very confused as to why I was going to the ER.   We got to the ER, my mom beat the ambulance (anyone who's ever driven with my mom shouldn't be surprised by this) and that started 36 hours of scary hospital stuff.

My heart rate wouldn't come down, even after tons of IV fluids, and a chest x-ray showed that I had a pretty bad case of pneumonia in my upper right lobe.  (My lungs didn't hurt until we actually got to the hospital, so that was kind of interesting.)  They consulted with the endocrinologist in the hospital, who knew me, and she came down to visit.  I couldn't keep anything down at this point, so they wanted to keep me at least overnight to try and get my fever to come down and get some IV antibiotics into me.

Once we got to the floor, they had my dad hang my IV bags up on the ceiling so they would drip faster.  They tried to start a second IV so we could have two bags going at once, but after 4 tries to get a vein they called it quits.  My fever was still scarily high, so the nurse brought in a bucket of ice and wet washcloths and started covering me.  Not the most comfortable thing, and kind of scary.  While they were doing this I think 3 nurses and the NP were in the room watching to see if that would help. My heart rate ended up going down to the 120's, which is still way too high but given the fever and infection understandable.

I got no sleep, they kept coming in every 5 minutes to check on me, and I was stuck on a stretcher instead of an inpatient bed.  (Very narrow and hard as a rock).  I couldn't lay down because I couldn't breathe, and I was so tired that sitting up was difficult.  The next morning my fever was down around 100, which was good, and my heart rate went down to 110.  They stalled all day, waiting for lab work and another chest xray, then told me they wanted me to stay another night for observation.  I had a little bit of a tantrum and told them that my heart rate was not going to change until I could go home, relax, and sleep, and having 20 people come in and check my heart rate and being hooked up to 20 machines was not helping me to relax.  The nurse told me she agreed but I would have to sign myself out against medical advice.  I did it.  Such a rebel haha.  My mom said she felt comfortable that I would know if I needed to go back, so she gave me the OK too.

So that was how I spent the beginning of this week.  I'm out of work again, obviously, until at least next Wednesday.  I'm afraid to go back because if I got this sick, this fast, I'm afraid of what else I will catch!  I go to my endocrinologist on Monday though, so we'll have to see what she thinks about all of this.  Wonderful way to end my 23rd year.

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