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First Adrenal Insufficiency/Crisis Situation

I'm way overdue for an update but I haven't had much to update anyone on! I started thyroid replacement and have worked my way down to 15mg a day, which seems to be a good dose for me. I'm down more than 20 lbs which is very exciting!

Yesterday was quite a scare for me. I woke up at 5am feeling horrible, and spent the next hour in the bathroom. I knew things were getting worse pretty fast so I called my cousin who lives next door, but he was at work and couldn't help me. My aunt who also lives very close was away in Florida, my mom and sister are in Colorado, so I called my dad who lives about 30 minutes away. He jumped in the car and stayed on the phone with me the whole way. I called my poor endocrinologist and woke her up, and she said to give myself an injection and get to a hospital ASAP. I felt my mind and body slipping, and by the time my dad got here, I was getting very nervous. I managed to give myself an injection of steroids and was soon on my way to the hospital. My first shot was uneventful, it definitely didn't hurt and was a lot easier than I expected, but I'm sure my mind was busy trying to concentrate on everything else going on.

I arrived at the ER and went up to the desk and said per my endocrinologist's instructions "I am having an adrenal crisis and need to be treated very quickly". She looked at me for a second and made me write my name down and said she would be right with me. Less than a minute later I was flown through registration and taken back to the ER where a nurse immediately started an IV, drew labs, and then once they got results, started fluids and zofran.

I'm home now and am impressed with how things went - the doctor that I had in the ER even remembered me from when I came in after my pituitary surgery. He took time to make sure I was wearing a medical alert bracelet and wanted to be educated about my condition.

Although frustrating, I am glad that this was not as serious as it could've been and now I know that my local hospital is capable of delivering good and appropriate care for these situations. I am now confidant that I can handle this should it happen again, and injections weren't so scary after all. I am going to spend the next few days taking it easy at home, and hopefully won't overdo it this weekend (I have to move!).

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