Skip to main content

Service Dogs

Have you ever looked into service dogs or do you have one?  I'm starting to look into it after a conversation I had recently.  I've had it in the back of my mind for a while, but never thought seriously about it.  I have looked at service dog websites, but they usually list just a few conditions that they will train dogs for.  Those conditions vary slightly from site to site but usually include hearing impairment, visual impairment, seizure disorder, PTSD, and autism.  The Americans with Disabilities Act or ADA states that a service dog is any dog that is trained to provide a task for a person that has a disability covered under the ADA.

I may qualify to get a service dog, but if not, I will get a companion dog.  I think I need someone or something to take care of, and could use some help taking care of me emotionally.  I've also always wanted another dog ever since my childhood dog died before I went to college.

What do you think about pets or service animals for disabled people?  Do you have a service animal?  Would you ever have one?  What service would it provide for you?

Comments

  1. I think a dog, service or companion, could be incredibly helpful. I think this is a great idea for all the reasons you mentioned above and a dog would be very lucky to have someone so loving as its owner!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have a Maltese service dog. She is PTSD dog. When I was married my husband was abusive. He did not hit me but his mental, sexual, verbal and emotional abuse destroyed me. I stayed with him for 22 years before I got the courage to finally divorce him. When I filed for divorce he came home from work one day and attacked me. I was terrified and after my divorce was final he continued to harass me. By that time I was sure I was worthless, no one would ever want me, I had no reason to live. I tried to kill myself. I carved the words "I hate me" in my arm, took a bottle of pills and went to sleep. The next thing I knew the police broke in and I went to a hospital for 6 weeks. It is now 25 years later and I still have nightmares about him. I went through years of therapy but the only thing that helped was when I got my service dog. She literally saved my life and gave it a new meaning. If you have a disability that you think will be helped by a service dog the go and get one. As long as the dog can do tasks to help you in your every day life it is a legitimate service dog. My Princess can help me in more ways than you can imagine. She can bring my medication, she can alert me ahead of time if I am going to have a panic or anxiety attack, She can pull an emergency cord in my apartment to alert the office that I need help. (similar to the cord in a hospital) She is able to calm me if I am upset. She reminds me to take my medication, she does too many things to name. You do not have to spend thousands on training. I trained Princess myself. If you are able to train your own dog, you can. You just have to make sure your dog passes the AKC Canine Good Citizen Test and the Public Access Test. There are several websites that can help you with self training. Start with Basic obedience and go from there. I wish you the best of luck. A service dog must pass those two tests and be clean, well groomed. It must be obedient, never vicious and a service dog must be able to do some tasks that you can not do for yourself. If you can teach your dog that, then you have a service dog. Good luck.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Plastic Surgery

When I was 17, I thought about getting a breast reduction.  I was still pretty thin at this point and it bothered me to by bigger clothes just to fit my bust.  I had a hard time exercising and always had back pain and grooves in my shoulders where my bra straps sat. I had a few consults with different plastic surgeons and ended up scheduling surgery for the week before my high school graduation.  I ended up "chickening out" because I didn't want the surgery to have any impact on my graduation, and I hadn't had any major surgeries before.  I started gaining weight due to Cushing's shortly after, so it worked out for the best in the end.

Now, my breast size has gone way down since I've lost weight, and even though they are still bigger than average, they don't get in my way as much and are more proportional to my body. These days, my plastic surgery dream is to have a tummy tuck.  I have a lot of excess skin on my body, especially on my belly, and in a drea…

Cushing's Awareness Challenge - Day 9

The only potentially permanent treatment for Cushing's is surgery.  Whether you have a pituitary tumor, adrenal tumor, or ectopic source of ACTH, most often, you will eventually need surgery.

For me, the first step was a pituitary surgery to try to remove the tumor in my pituitary gland. They went through my nose to access the pituitary gland, which means you have no visible scars after.
I was very nervous heading into the surgery, but didn't have much time to dwell on it, as my surgery was scheduled about a week after my IPSS.  I talked to a lot of people before, about their experiences, and heard vastly different stories from each person.
The only thing I remember from before my surgery was being rolled down what looked like a basement hallway (all concrete), while passing maybe 30 operating rooms.  I saw patients in the hallways on stretchers waiting for surgery, I saw into the small windows in the doors to operating rooms, it was a very scary experience.  Obviously, not ev…

The Challenges of Getting a Diagnosis

I have been asked about this so many times, and talk about it a lot, whenever someone asks me about Cushing's.  So many people have the same experience - KNOWING you have Cushing's, and seeing 5, 10, 20, or more doctors over the course of many years before you officially have a diagnosis.  I would say this is one of the most common links I have with other "Cushies".  We all fought for a diagnosis, heard we were just fat and depressed, waited with hope after every test, until a day came when one test came back high, or a brain MRI showed a tumor in the pituitary gland.

I think the reason I haven't written about it is because it's one of the hardest things to sit down and spend time on.  It's painful, and of course, I can't help but wonder what my life might be like today if I was diagnosed sooner.  Would I have needed an adrenalectomy?  Or for that matter, a second pituitary surgery? Would I have as many health issues after Cushing's?  It's ha…