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Happy 2014!


Happy New Year everyone!  I hope you all got to celebrate with friends and family.  I obviously spent it here in my friend's vacation house looking up at a ski resort.  (Although, we didn't ski.  It was too cold). 

2013 was another roller coaster year.  It started in the hospital with adrenal insufficiency, and ended with hormone craziness that left me on the verge of tears for 2 weeks.   I managed to fight through an adrenal crisis, kidney stones galore, hemiplegic migraines, and never ending strep throat.  I got some attention from boys (nothing serious though), spent more time with great friends, and managed to sneak in 2 vacations, one to Martha's Vineyard and one to New Hampshire. The biggest, greatest part of my year?  Huck, of course.  He's been my constant companion, my guard dog, my walking buddy, and my couch cuddle buddy.  Hands down, best thing that will probably ever happen to me aside from having/adopting a baby someday. 

I don't typically do New Year's resolutions, but I have a few things I would like to focus on in the upcoming year. 

I would like to try to think of myself in a more positive way.  No fat talk, no trashing myself, not getting upset with my body when it doesn't do what I want it to. 

I hope instead of 1 hospital admission, I can have 0.  Hopefully, no more kidney stones, no more neurological issues, no more adrenal insufficiency.  With that said, I have been better with meds and taking them on time, but I think I can do a little better.

I hope your 2014 is amazing, let me know what you're goals/resolutions for 2014 are!

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