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Happy New Year!

Happy 2015!  With a new year, lots of people make resolutions.  The most common resolution?  To exercise more, to get back to the gym.  As many of my friends and family members know, I am not one to jump at the chance of physical activity.  There are very few active things that I find enjoyable.  I grew up skiing every weekend, and was an active kid, participating in dance classes, cheerleading, and even trying soccer.  

Even though I was an active child, I dreaded gym class, and used to look for excuses when it came time for fitness tests like running a mile, doing pull ups, or climbing that rope to the ceiling.  Despite all of this, I think most of my fear came from not being able to keep up with friends and classmates, or not being able to complete the task.  In college, this lead to getting a doctor's excuse so I wouldn't have to complete my physical education requirements, something that most of my friends looked forward too.  Getting school credit for skiing, bowling or taking a yoga class was a big plus for most students, but for me, it was another chance to be embarrassed by my lack of ability. 

Today, my medical conditions like Lupus and Cushing's make things like climbing more than 1 flight of stairs difficult.  I often can't keep up with people when going for a walk, and don't run unless I have to chase down Huck.  

My New Year's resolution, although very unoriginal, is to be more active.  Whether that means taking longer walks with Huck instead of taking him to the beach or park to run around, or even taking a yoga or dance class, I will try.  Don't expect to see me at the gym running on a treadmill or lifting weights, but making little changes to make daily life a little easier.


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