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I Quit

I finally, after over a year of talking about it, I FINALLY quit my job. My discrimination complaint is still pending, and could take 18-24 months from the date of my complaint (September 2015) to move to the next step.

I planned and planned to take this step, but just had trouble pulling the trigger.  I was afraid of having no money, afraid to have nothing to do, and afraid to tell people. It's embarrassing to not be able to work.  I know, I have a legitimate reason not to at this very moment, and I'm eventually going to work again. It's a tough call.  But, after talking to my mom, she expressed great concern for my health and wellbeing (what's left, that is), if I kept going with no changes.  She was waiting for me to end up in the hospital again, and afraid that my body physically could not take it anymore. 

So, I quit.  I gave my notice in October, tried to tell some of my coworkers but didn't feel like my leaving was worthy of celebration. It was sad.  Don't get me wrong, I was not the biggest fan of the job I had, and dreaded going in every morning, but it was difficult to leave. 

On my last week of work, my dad was acting strange.  He wasn't remembering things, and kept repeating himself.  I asked him to please go to the emergency room but he didn't want to, and had just seen his PCP, who diagnosed him with an ear infection and sent him home on antibiotics.  The next day, he had a CT of his head which showed a cyst in his brain, and it was causing severe hydrocephalus.  He was rushed to Brigham and Women's hospital to have surgery.  

The surgery was a success, but he didn't seem right after, he seemed worse than before.  He attempted to go home but ended up back at the hospital the next day.  Again, he tried to go home but he collapsed into his apartment.  Back at the hospital, they found a blood clot in his lungs, and he was sent back to Brigham and Women's for treatment, but when he got there, it was worse than we expected.  He needed emergency open heart surgery to remove the clot, NOW.  

My mom drove me up, and I just made it in time to see him before he went into surgery.  He spent about a week in the cardiac unit, and then went to a rehabilitation hospital for another 3 weeks.  He's now home, and doing well.

So, things did not go as planned for any of us! I am just now adjusting to all this free time.  My mom gifted me a membership to a gym, so I could start swimming again.  I'm still waiting for results on an exercise test I had in November. I applied for SSDI benefits, and am still waiting on a decision.

Hopefully the next few months will be less stressful for everyone! Happy Holidays!



Comments

  1. oh my goodness... I'm so sorry you had such a rough week! This sounds like the perfect opportunity for you to focus on your self for a little while! If you need to feel a little more fulfilled with your days you could always look into volunteering somewhere? Radio stations need volunteers for concerts and events, shelters need help with the animals, children's hospitals, soup kitchens, libraries, a lonely neighbor.... you name it, there is probably someone who could use some help! Spreading more good in to world always helps your soul feel good and its something you can choose how much time you give.

    If you're crafty, you could always open your own business on etsy. It doesn't pay a ton unless it takes off like wildfire and you really put a ton of time into it, but if its something you enjoy doing it gives you a little extra play money.

    Praying for you and your Dad.

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