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Cushing's Awareness Challenge - Day 14

Hospital gowns, as I have said many, many times, are not fun to wear.  They can leave you exposed, they are typically too big, and are generally uncomfortable.  When I am staying in the hospital, I usually change into my own clothes as soon as possible.  I am still waiting for someone to re-design hospital gowns!

In the meantime, I am going to share what I usually pack, or have my family members bring to the hospital for me to wear.

I've already told you about footwear, and usually bring flip flops, no matter what the season.  They are easy to slip on and off, and can be easily washed when you get home.  My favorites are the these.

For tops, I love the Breathe tee's from Gap.  They are technically workout tops, but I wear them more as lounge wear.  I used to also wear them to work, with scrubs.  My favorite style is the v-neck tee.  They are super soft, stretchy, and breathable (obviously why they named them).  I love the solid colors, but my favorites are the striped ones, which are only available occasionally.

I usually also bring a zip up sweatshirt for when it gets a little chilly.  The zipper makes it easy to take on and off without disturbing IVs.

For pants, I love any leggings or yoga pants.  I usually opt for a looser fit pant for the hospital, and have wider leg Z by Zella pants from Nordstrom Rack that I love.  I also really like the gap pure body pants, especially these joggers. (Although, mine might be different as they are from a few years ago).


What do you like to wear when you are in the hospital, or what would you pack?






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